Book cover for The Rising Flood: the image shows a stormy sky and a collapsing bridge, with a figure in the foreground casting a spell towards it.

The Rising Flood, Book III of The Marek Series

"Fantasy politics with real nuance and believable uncertainty, characters whose richness and depth has developed over three books, and a growing threat that starts pulling together threads across the series make The Rising Flood a fantastic read, while Marek is a textured place that is a joy to return to.” — Malka Older, Hugo Award finalist author of the Centenal Cycle series

There's darkness in the heart of Teren. Refugees, fleeing demons unleashed by the Academy, arrive in Marek; but Marek, dreaming of independence, is increasingly unstable.

Marcia, Heir to House Fereno — expecting a child and with her relationship in ruins — battles to manage threats internal and external, while rebels from the lower city demand change in rabble-rousing pamphlets, and Marek’s two remaining sorcerers, Marcia's brother Cato and her ex-lover Reb, struggle to train more. Teren's many demons threaten, and no one is ready.

Menaced by the distant capital, by dissension from within, and by out-of-season storms rampaging across the Oval Sea by nature itself — will the rising flood lift all boats? Or will they be capsized?

"I found The Rising Flood an engrossing read, the fullness of the prose transporting me to a world that is complex and well-realised, but also emotionally and politically recognisable. It’s a novel that appreciates the weight and complexity of adult decision making, and the nuances of how personal relationships sometimes have to be politically navigated." — Andi C. Buchanan, author of From A Shadow Grave

Buy now from your favourite e-book retailer! (Paperback out Dec 7th 2021.)

The sequel to The Deep And Shining Darkbuy it now from your preferred online retailer.

Marcia wants to make changes in Marek after the events of the summer, but now distant Teren is making a play for political power in the city. Meanwhile, Tait, a young Teren sorcerer on the run, sees Marek and its cityangel Beckett as a place of safety; which will be true only until Beckett discovers there's a demon chasing Tait. Are the demon and the machinations of the Teren Lieutenant connected? Are Marcia's political goals worth the risk of facing down a demon? And can Marcia's sorcerer brother Cato avoid getting involved?

"Shadow and Storm is an absolute delight to read, the literary equivalent of sinking into the embrace of a dear friend. Warm and cosy but never short on adventure and intrigue, Kemp's second entry into this series won't disappoint. The characters are real, full of depth, and richly drawn, and you'll wish you had even more time with them by book's end. A fantastic read!" — Rivers Solomon, Locus, Tiptree, and Lambda Award finalist

Buy Shadow and Storm as an ebook now! (Paperback available from your local bookshop, or direct from Elsewhen.)

Cover of Shadow and Storm; a statue overlooks a stormy sky, with two figures talking in the background.
Book cover for "The Deep And Shining Dark" by Juliet Kemp, Book 1 of the Marek Series. Cover shows sailing ships in a dock at sunset.

The Deep And Shining Dark (Elsewhen Press, 2018)

"A rich and memorable tale of political ambition, family and magic, set in an imagined city that feels as vibrant as the characters inhabiting it." — Aliette de Bodard, Nebula-award winning author of The Tea Master and the Detective

"A novel that’s one part high fantasy, one part political fantasy, and one part old-fashioned sword-and-sorcery – without the swords or the lack of realistic diversity to which old-fashioned sword-and-sorcery was often prone." — Liz Bourke, Locus

Juliet Kemp's The Deep And Shining Dark (Elsewhen) was one of the best debuts of the year, set in a chewy and thought-provoking secondary world that one hopes to see more of." — Graham Sleight, Locus Recommended Reading List 2018

"an entertaining and well written fantasy novel with subtle complexity, good worldbuilding and fluent characterisation" — Rising Shadow

A Starbound Solstice (Robot Dinosaur Press, 2021)

A festive space queer romance that will melt your heart and warm your exosuit.

Linn and xyr crew are halfway through their long journey from Earth to Cetalla; what better time to celebrate a solstice? Bid farewell to Sol and hello to a new homestar. Traditions around mistletoe—not to mention Linn’s totally non-existent crush on xyr crewmate Taye—have nothing to do with it.

Explaining paperchains to xyr alien crewmate and plotting present-giving keeps Linn busy enough, but then something goes wrong with Heron, the ship’s AI. Tracing the cause to a giant hullbreach onto needlespace, Linn and Taye have no idea what to do about it, or the stranger who came through it.

Can they save their ship and get to their new home before the pressures of needlespace damage Heron beyond repair? And is Linn ever going to get that kiss under the mistletoe?

"This is such a sweet science fiction holiday story set on an interstellar ship, with just enough natural tension to be fun but with an overriding message of hope and kindness and a real feeling of light - just perfect for the theme of a solstice celebration." It reminded me of the very BEST kind of Doctor Who episode, and I enjoyed every moment of it!" — Stephanie Burgis, author

A-Starbound-Solstice-Generic
An androgynous person with brown skin and short dark hair sits on a dock, with the sea at their feet. They have silver marks on their skin. Behind them there are floating buildings in the distance.

A Glimmer Of Silver (The Book Smugglers, 2018)

“A Glimmer Of Silver, from @booksmugglers, is bloody brilliant. A really interesting, well told, fascinating piece of ecological fiction. Plus, one pronoun for all, and it's xe!” — D Franklin

"a warm and delightful SF YA novella - it reminds me in the best way of what it might be like if Robin McKinley wrote science fiction." — Stephanie Burgis

"A Glimmer of Silver reminds us that, sometimes, the most potent barriers exist not between species, but between ourselves. But in its insistence that these barriers are not insurmountable, it speaks to the possibilities—and the hopes—of translation and coexistence, at the meeting points of sentience." ‐ Gautum Bhatia, Strange Horizons